DAGUERROTYPE

by Kiyoshi Kurosawa
THE WOMAN IN THE SILVER PLATE

Informations

Nation: France, Japan, Belgium

Year: 2016

Length: 131'

34° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

After his beloved wife passes away, the famous photographer Stéphane tries to fill the void by making full-size daguerreotypes which seem to almost capture a part of their subjects. When young Jean becomes his assistant, he finds himself involved in Stéphane’s obsessions and falls in love with the photographer’s daughter Marie, the main model for the pictures. She, too, loves Jean but, in order to live their love story, the two young people must escape from that world of images and their surprisingly dynamic power. [mp]

Director

Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Kiyoshi Kurosawa (Kobe, Japan, 1955) studied at Rikkyo Daigaku and then worked as assistant, director of short films in 8mm, and early productions for the video market. In 1997 his metaphysical thriller Cure gave him his first success at the Tokyo International Film Festival. His later works, most of which have participated at the world’s top festivals, have made him one of the new authors of Japanese cinema. His short film Soul Dancing was presented in 2004 at the Torino Film Festival, where he returned the following year with Loft. In 2008, Tokyo Sonata, starring Koji Yakusho, won the Jury Prize in Un certain regard at the Cannes Film Festival, a section he returned to in 2015 with Journey to the Shore, which won Best Director.

Filmography:

Suito Homu (Sweet Home, 1989), Katte ni shiyagare! Gyakuten keikaku (1996), Hebi no michi (Serpent’s Path, 1997), Ningen gokaku (License to Live, 1998), Kumo no hitomi (Eyes of the Spider, 1998), Karisuma (Charisma, 1999), Oinaru genei (Barren Illusions, 1999), Kaïro (Pulse, 2001), Akarui mirai (Bright Future, 2003), Dopperugenga (Doppelganger, 2003), Ghost Cop (2004), Shi no otome (Loft, 2005), Sakebi (Castigo, 2006), Riaru: Kanzen naru kubinagaryû no hi (Real, 2012), Sebunsu kôdo (Seventh Code, 2013), Kurip (Creepy, 2016).                        

Cast and Credits

regia, sceneggiatura/director, screenplay
Kiyoshi Kurosawa
fotografia/cinematography
Alexis Kavyrchine
montaggio/film editing
Véronique Lange
musica/music
Grégoire Hetzel
suono/sound
Erwan Kerzanet, Emmanuel de Boissieu
interpreti e personaggi/cast and characters
Tahar Rahim (Jean), Constance Rousseau (Marie), Olivier Gourmet (Stéphane)
produttore/producer
Michiko Yoshitake
produzione/production
Les Productions Balthazar


contatti/contacts
Celluloid Dreams
Pascale Ramonda
[email protected]
www.celluloid-dreams.com

Director statement

“I used to create yakuza or crime film where the stories were centered around feuds between men, nowhere near being a romantic artist. You could say those were the only jobs offered to me back then. ‘Death’ clearly meant the ‘end’ in this genre. But when I started creating horror films and as more ghosts have appeared in my films, ‘death’ transformed into something that is spanned towards eternity or immortality. I suppose the human relationships my characters have has naturally gained a romantic lyricism in the midst of this shift.”

Synopsis Learn more

After his beloved wife passes away, the famous photographer Stéphane tries to fill the void by making full-size daguerreotypes which seem to almost capture a part of their subjects. When young Jean becomes his assistant, he finds himself involved in Stéphane’s obsessions and falls in love with the photographer’s daughter Marie, the main model for the pictures. She, too, loves Jean but, in order to live their love story, the two young people must escape from that world of images and their surprisingly dynamic power. [mp]

Director All about direction

Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Kiyoshi Kurosawa (Kobe, Japan, 1955) studied at Rikkyo Daigaku and then worked as assistant, director of short films in 8mm, and early productions for the video market. In 1997 his metaphysical thriller Cure gave him his first success at the Tokyo International Film Festival. His later works, most of which have participated at the world’s top festivals, have made him one of the new authors of Japanese cinema. His short film Soul Dancing was presented in 2004 at the Torino Film Festival, where he returned the following year with Loft. In 2008, Tokyo Sonata, starring Koji Yakusho, won the Jury Prize in Un certain regard at the Cannes Film Festival, a section he returned to in 2015 with Journey to the Shore, which won Best Director.

Filmography:

Suito Homu (Sweet Home, 1989), Katte ni shiyagare! Gyakuten keikaku (1996), Hebi no michi (Serpent’s Path, 1997), Ningen gokaku (License to Live, 1998), Kumo no hitomi (Eyes of the Spider, 1998), Karisuma (Charisma, 1999), Oinaru genei (Barren Illusions, 1999), Kaïro (Pulse, 2001), Akarui mirai (Bright Future, 2003), Dopperugenga (Doppelganger, 2003), Ghost Cop (2004), Shi no otome (Loft, 2005), Sakebi (Castigo, 2006), Riaru: Kanzen naru kubinagaryû no hi (Real, 2012), Sebunsu kôdo (Seventh Code, 2013), Kurip (Creepy, 2016).                        

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia, sceneggiatura/director, screenplay
Kiyoshi Kurosawa
fotografia/cinematography
Alexis Kavyrchine
montaggio/film editing
Véronique Lange
musica/music
Grégoire Hetzel
suono/sound
Erwan Kerzanet, Emmanuel de Boissieu
interpreti e personaggi/cast and characters
Tahar Rahim (Jean), Constance Rousseau (Marie), Olivier Gourmet (Stéphane)
produttore/producer
Michiko Yoshitake
produzione/production
Les Productions Balthazar


contatti/contacts
Celluloid Dreams
Pascale Ramonda
[email protected]
www.celluloid-dreams.com

Director statement Read more

“I used to create yakuza or crime film where the stories were centered around feuds between men, nowhere near being a romantic artist. You could say those were the only jobs offered to me back then. ‘Death’ clearly meant the ‘end’ in this genre. But when I started creating horror films and as more ghosts have appeared in my films, ‘death’ transformed into something that is spanned towards eternity or immortality. I suppose the human relationships my characters have has naturally gained a romantic lyricism in the midst of this shift.”