TURN LEFT TURN RIGHT

by Douglas Seok
TURN LEFT TURN RIGHT

Informations

Nation: Cambodia, USA, South Korea

Year: 2016

Length: 68'

34° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The twenty-year-old Kanitha is hyperactive and a free spirit. Her very traditional mother would like to see her married and settled. Her father, elderly and sick, is nearing his deathbed. Kanitha is a dreamer, she loves pop music and keeps losing one job after another. But what she really wants is to share one last happy moment with her father: seek out a childhood memory, find a little something to do together so they can be close like they used to. [rm]

Director

Douglas Seok

Douglas  Seok

Douglas Seok (Chicago, IL, USA, 1983) lives and works in Seoul, South Korea. He has a master’s in digital cinema from Chicago’s DePaul University. He worked as Lee Isaac Chung’s assistant director for Lucky Life (2010) and Abigail Harm (2012). In 2015, he was the photography director for Steve Chen’s Dream Land. All three movies were presented in the Onde section of the Torino Film Festival. Turn Left Turn Right (2016) is his first feature.

Filmography:
Turn Left Turn Right (2016).

Cast and Credits

regia, soggetto, sceneggiatura, montaggio/director, story, screenplay, film editing
Douglas Seok
fotografia/cinematography
Steve Chen
suono/sound
Min Eun Seo, Jean-Baptiste Haehl
interpreti e personaggi/cast and characters
Kanitha Tith (Kanitha), Thavy Pov (la madre/mother), Vanthoeun Bo (il padre/father), Saveth Dy (Dy Saveth) 
produttori/producers
Steve Chen, Douglas Seok
produzione/production
Sea Oak Studios, Anti-Archive


contatti/contacts
Anti-Archive
Steve Chen

steve.chen@antiarchive.com

Director statement

“The editing process was arduous, but that’s how I unearthed the film. I thought about what the film could feel like as an object and experimented with the source materials that had been recorded. I began molding the trove of Cambodian rock music that motivated many scenes, deciding to treat parts of the film in a more sculptural way. I was limited to using effects like superimposition and layering but found that such simple techniques could yield a deep, rich texture for the film.”

Synopsis Learn more

Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The twenty-year-old Kanitha is hyperactive and a free spirit. Her very traditional mother would like to see her married and settled. Her father, elderly and sick, is nearing his deathbed. Kanitha is a dreamer, she loves pop music and keeps losing one job after another. But what she really wants is to share one last happy moment with her father: seek out a childhood memory, find a little something to do together so they can be close like they used to. [rm]

Director All about direction

Douglas Seok

Douglas  Seok

Douglas Seok (Chicago, IL, USA, 1983) lives and works in Seoul, South Korea. He has a master’s in digital cinema from Chicago’s DePaul University. He worked as Lee Isaac Chung’s assistant director for Lucky Life (2010) and Abigail Harm (2012). In 2015, he was the photography director for Steve Chen’s Dream Land. All three movies were presented in the Onde section of the Torino Film Festival. Turn Left Turn Right (2016) is his first feature.

Filmography:
Turn Left Turn Right (2016).

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia, soggetto, sceneggiatura, montaggio/director, story, screenplay, film editing
Douglas Seok
fotografia/cinematography
Steve Chen
suono/sound
Min Eun Seo, Jean-Baptiste Haehl
interpreti e personaggi/cast and characters
Kanitha Tith (Kanitha), Thavy Pov (la madre/mother), Vanthoeun Bo (il padre/father), Saveth Dy (Dy Saveth) 
produttori/producers
Steve Chen, Douglas Seok
produzione/production
Sea Oak Studios, Anti-Archive


contatti/contacts
Anti-Archive
Steve Chen

steve.chen@antiarchive.com

Director statement Read more

“The editing process was arduous, but that’s how I unearthed the film. I thought about what the film could feel like as an object and experimented with the source materials that had been recorded. I began molding the trove of Cambodian rock music that motivated many scenes, deciding to treat parts of the film in a more sculptural way. I was limited to using effects like superimposition and layering but found that such simple techniques could yield a deep, rich texture for the film.”