ANTIPORNO

by Sion Sono
ANTIPORNO - ANTIPORNO

Informations

Nation: Japan

Year: 2016

Length: 78'

34° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

Kyoko is a twenty-one-year-old artist who loves being at the center of attention. One day, feeling down, she lashes out against her assistant, sexually humiliating her in front of the rest of the staff. Suddenly someone yells “Cut!” and we realize that they are actually on a movie set. A fracture in reality that allows Noriko to take back the upper hand and turn the tables of humiliations onto Kyoko. [mp]

Director

Sion Sono

Sion Sono

Sion Sono (Toyokawa, Japan, 1961) is an internationally acclaimed Japanese filmmaker. His movies depict Japanese society in a provocative and violent way, amid a plethora of pop culture references. His most renown films include Suicide Club (2002), which is part of a trilogy on alienation along with Noriko’s Dinner Table (2005), winner of the Berliner Zeitung Jury Award, and Love Exposure (2008), winner of the FIPRESCI Award and the Caligari Film Award at the Berlinale. Love Exposure is also the first film of the “trilogy of hate,” which includes Cold Fish (2010) and Guilty of Romance (2011). He participated to the Venice Film Festival in 2011 with the feature Himizu, and in 2013 with Why Don’t You Play in Hell. The Torino Film Festival paid tribute to him with a retrospective in 2011. He participated in several TFF editions with his films Tokyo Tribe (2014), Love & Peace (2015), TAG (2015) and Shinjuku Swan (2015).

Filmography:
The Room (1992), Suicide Club (2002), Noriko’s Dinner Table (2005), Strange Circus (2005), Hazard (2006), Exte: Hair Extensions (2007), Love Exposure (2008), Cold Fish (2010), Guilty of Romance (2011), Himizu (2011), Why Don’t You Play in Hell (2013), Tokyo Tribe (2014), Love & Peace (2015), Riaru onigokko (TAG, 2015), Shinjuku suwan (Shinjuku Swan, 2015), Antiporno (2016), Tokyo Vampire Hotel (serie tv/tv series, 2017).

Cast and Credits

regia, soggetto, sceneggiatura/director, story, screenplay
Sion Sono
fotografia/cinematography
Maki Ito
montaggio/film editing
Junichi Ito
scenografia/production design
Hirofumi Nishikiori
costumi/costume design
Kazuhiro Sawataishi
musica/music
Tomonobu Kikuchi
suono/sound
Hironori Ito
interpreti/cast
Ami Tomite, Fujiko, Sayaka Kotani, Mana Yoshimuta, Ami, Ai Shimomura, Ami Fukuda, Yuya Takayama, Dai Hasegawa, Hirari Ikeda, Saki, Hideyuki Kobashi, Hitedoshi Kawaya, Takumi Banda, Tomo Uchino
produttori/producers
Naoko Komuro, Masahiko Takahashi
produzione/production
Django Film


contatti/contacts
Nikkatsu
Mami Furukawa
m.furukawa@nikkatsu.co.jp
www.nikkatsu.com

Director statement

 “Sion Sono creates a porn film while heavily criticizing itself. He intends to bring to the surface porn’s perspectives and to show that both social power structure and human relationship are interchangeable when the different points of view are connected through cinema. Once the audience hears ‘Cut!’, the tables suddenly turn: the balance of power between real-life and fictional characters instantly reverses. Inherently, how can we separate fact from fiction? And who can tell right from wrong?” (N. Komuro, M. Takahashi)

Synopsis Learn more

Kyoko is a twenty-one-year-old artist who loves being at the center of attention. One day, feeling down, she lashes out against her assistant, sexually humiliating her in front of the rest of the staff. Suddenly someone yells “Cut!” and we realize that they are actually on a movie set. A fracture in reality that allows Noriko to take back the upper hand and turn the tables of humiliations onto Kyoko. [mp]

Director All about direction

Sion Sono

Sion Sono

Sion Sono (Toyokawa, Japan, 1961) is an internationally acclaimed Japanese filmmaker. His movies depict Japanese society in a provocative and violent way, amid a plethora of pop culture references. His most renown films include Suicide Club (2002), which is part of a trilogy on alienation along with Noriko’s Dinner Table (2005), winner of the Berliner Zeitung Jury Award, and Love Exposure (2008), winner of the FIPRESCI Award and the Caligari Film Award at the Berlinale. Love Exposure is also the first film of the “trilogy of hate,” which includes Cold Fish (2010) and Guilty of Romance (2011). He participated to the Venice Film Festival in 2011 with the feature Himizu, and in 2013 with Why Don’t You Play in Hell. The Torino Film Festival paid tribute to him with a retrospective in 2011. He participated in several TFF editions with his films Tokyo Tribe (2014), Love & Peace (2015), TAG (2015) and Shinjuku Swan (2015).

Filmography:
The Room (1992), Suicide Club (2002), Noriko’s Dinner Table (2005), Strange Circus (2005), Hazard (2006), Exte: Hair Extensions (2007), Love Exposure (2008), Cold Fish (2010), Guilty of Romance (2011), Himizu (2011), Why Don’t You Play in Hell (2013), Tokyo Tribe (2014), Love & Peace (2015), Riaru onigokko (TAG, 2015), Shinjuku suwan (Shinjuku Swan, 2015), Antiporno (2016), Tokyo Vampire Hotel (serie tv/tv series, 2017).

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia, soggetto, sceneggiatura/director, story, screenplay
Sion Sono
fotografia/cinematography
Maki Ito
montaggio/film editing
Junichi Ito
scenografia/production design
Hirofumi Nishikiori
costumi/costume design
Kazuhiro Sawataishi
musica/music
Tomonobu Kikuchi
suono/sound
Hironori Ito
interpreti/cast
Ami Tomite, Fujiko, Sayaka Kotani, Mana Yoshimuta, Ami, Ai Shimomura, Ami Fukuda, Yuya Takayama, Dai Hasegawa, Hirari Ikeda, Saki, Hideyuki Kobashi, Hitedoshi Kawaya, Takumi Banda, Tomo Uchino
produttori/producers
Naoko Komuro, Masahiko Takahashi
produzione/production
Django Film


contatti/contacts
Nikkatsu
Mami Furukawa
m.furukawa@nikkatsu.co.jp
www.nikkatsu.com

Director statement Read more

 “Sion Sono creates a porn film while heavily criticizing itself. He intends to bring to the surface porn’s perspectives and to show that both social power structure and human relationship are interchangeable when the different points of view are connected through cinema. Once the audience hears ‘Cut!’, the tables suddenly turn: the balance of power between real-life and fictional characters instantly reverses. Inherently, how can we separate fact from fiction? And who can tell right from wrong?” (N. Komuro, M. Takahashi)