IN PUNTO DI MORTE

by Mario Garriba
IN PUNTO DI MORTE - IN PUNTO DI MORTE

Informations

Nation: Italy

Year: 1971

Length: 57'

34° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

In Orvieto, a middle-class youth is behaving in an irreverent and mocking way towards his family, work and institutions, crushing every social barrier with his sarcasm. He won’t stop even in the face of death, playing an extreme and tragic game. [cg]


In collaboration with Cineteca Nazionale

Director

Mario Garriba

Mario Garriba

Mario Garriba (Soave, Verona, Italy, 1944 - Italy, 2013) debuted in feature films in 1971 with On the Point of Death, his graduating film at the Centro sperimentale di cinematografia which, a unique case in its genre, won the Golden Leopard at the Locarno Film Festival. He had previously directed the short Voce del verbo morire (1970). Over the course of his career, he made only one other movie, Lessons for the Lovelorn (1980), which he completed after several years and infinite resistance from the Italian film industry of the era.

Filmography:
Voce del verbo morire (cm, 1970), In punto di morte (1971), Corse a perdicuore (1980).

Cast and Credits

regia, sceneggiatura/director, screenplay
Mario Garriba
fotografia/cinematography
Mario Berta
montaggio/film editing
Fabio Garriba, Mario Garriba
scenografia/production design
Lidija Yurakic
musica/music
Dimitri Nicolau Golovnyi
interpreti/cast
Fabio Garriba, Elio Capitoli, Ercole Ercolani, Jobst Grapow, Luigi Guerra, Maria Marchi
produzione/production
Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia


contatti/contacts
Cineteca Nazionale
Laura Argento
laura.argento@fondazionecsc.it
www.fondazionecsc.it

Director statement

“I didn’t want to tell a story. Instead I took a character who, with his contradictions, would allow me to move continually from reality to fiction, from present to past, as though they were the same thing. A character caught in a provincial town, where every day looks the same and desires are all pointless. I got behind the movie camera dispassionately, looking at things through stationary shots. [...] This wasn’t by chance; in part, I made this decision because of the few means at my disposal: a 16mm Eclair, a Nagra III for shooting live, an estimate for seven million and fifteen work days. Thus, we had to find cinema within a structure which seemed to negate it or at least hide it.”

Synopsis Learn more

In Orvieto, a middle-class youth is behaving in an irreverent and mocking way towards his family, work and institutions, crushing every social barrier with his sarcasm. He won’t stop even in the face of death, playing an extreme and tragic game. [cg]


In collaboration with Cineteca Nazionale

Director All about direction

Mario Garriba

Mario Garriba

Mario Garriba (Soave, Verona, Italy, 1944 - Italy, 2013) debuted in feature films in 1971 with On the Point of Death, his graduating film at the Centro sperimentale di cinematografia which, a unique case in its genre, won the Golden Leopard at the Locarno Film Festival. He had previously directed the short Voce del verbo morire (1970). Over the course of his career, he made only one other movie, Lessons for the Lovelorn (1980), which he completed after several years and infinite resistance from the Italian film industry of the era.

Filmography:
Voce del verbo morire (cm, 1970), In punto di morte (1971), Corse a perdicuore (1980).

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia, sceneggiatura/director, screenplay
Mario Garriba
fotografia/cinematography
Mario Berta
montaggio/film editing
Fabio Garriba, Mario Garriba
scenografia/production design
Lidija Yurakic
musica/music
Dimitri Nicolau Golovnyi
interpreti/cast
Fabio Garriba, Elio Capitoli, Ercole Ercolani, Jobst Grapow, Luigi Guerra, Maria Marchi
produzione/production
Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia


contatti/contacts
Cineteca Nazionale
Laura Argento
laura.argento@fondazionecsc.it
www.fondazionecsc.it

Director statement Read more

“I didn’t want to tell a story. Instead I took a character who, with his contradictions, would allow me to move continually from reality to fiction, from present to past, as though they were the same thing. A character caught in a provincial town, where every day looks the same and desires are all pointless. I got behind the movie camera dispassionately, looking at things through stationary shots. [...] This wasn’t by chance; in part, I made this decision because of the few means at my disposal: a 16mm Eclair, a Nagra III for shooting live, an estimate for seven million and fifteen work days. Thus, we had to find cinema within a structure which seemed to negate it or at least hide it.”