LITTORIA

by Raffaello Matarazzo
LITTORIA - LITTORIA

Informations

Nation: Italy

Year: 1933

Length: 11'

34° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

The subject of this documentary is the foundation of Littoria – named Latina after 1945 –, one of the new towns sprung up in marshland after Agro pontino’s reclamation. The first part, “Palude,” shows us a stretch of water surrounded by small straw huts. The second part, “Bonifica,” illustrates the land’s reclamation works, the plowing, and finally the construction of the town. Houses and public buildings appear only later, while signs indicate the division into different areas. Children are busy playing, women bake bread: It’s the beginning of a new city: Littoria. Over house-roofs, fountains, barracks, the post-office and many other building is the symbol of the Fascist party: the fasces of Roman lictor. [rm]


In collaboration with Cineteca Nazionale

Director

Raffaello Matarazzo

Raffaello Matarazzo

Raffaello Matarazzo (Rome, Italy, 1909-1966) debuted as a film critic for “Il Tevere” and “L’Italia letteraria” and worked as assistant director for Mario Camerini. He debuted as a director in 1933 with Treno popolare, but its lack of success convinced him to turn to comedy, with movies such as L’anonima Roylott (1936), L’albergo degli assenti (1939) and Giorno di nozze (1942). After shooting a number of films in Spain, he began a multi-year collaboration with the production company Titanus and made a long series of movies starring Amedeo Nazzari and Yvonne Sanson, and written by Aldo De Benedetti (Chains, 1949; Torment, 1950; Nobody’s Children, 1951; Chi è senza peccato…, 1952; Torna!, 1953; The White Angel, 1955). He returned to comedy during the 1960s and ended his career with the melodrama My Love (1964).

Filmography:
Treno popolare (1933), Kiki (1934), Joe il rosso (1936), L’anonima Roylott (1936), Sono stato io! (1937), L’albergo degli assenti (1939), Giù il sipario (1940), Trappola d’amore (1940), Notte di fortuna (1941), Giorno di nozze (1942), Il birichino di papà (1943), La fumeria d’oppio (1947), Lo sciopero dei milioni (1948), Paolo e Francesca (1949), Catene (1949), Tormento (1950), I figli di nessuno (1951), Il tenente Giorgio (1952), Chi è senza peccato... (1953), Torna! (1953), Vortice (1953), La schiava del peccato (1954), L’angelo bianco (1955), La risaia (1956), L’ultima violenza (1957), Malinconico autunno (1958), Cerasella (1960), Adultero lui, adultera lei (1963), I terribili 7 (1964), Amore mio (1964).

Cast and Credits

regia/director
Raffaello Matarazzo


contatti/contacts
Cineteca Nazionale
Laura Argento
laura.argento@fondazionecsc.it
www.fondazionecsc.it

Synopsis Learn more

The subject of this documentary is the foundation of Littoria – named Latina after 1945 –, one of the new towns sprung up in marshland after Agro pontino’s reclamation. The first part, “Palude,” shows us a stretch of water surrounded by small straw huts. The second part, “Bonifica,” illustrates the land’s reclamation works, the plowing, and finally the construction of the town. Houses and public buildings appear only later, while signs indicate the division into different areas. Children are busy playing, women bake bread: It’s the beginning of a new city: Littoria. Over house-roofs, fountains, barracks, the post-office and many other building is the symbol of the Fascist party: the fasces of Roman lictor. [rm]


In collaboration with Cineteca Nazionale

Director All about direction

Raffaello Matarazzo

Raffaello Matarazzo

Raffaello Matarazzo (Rome, Italy, 1909-1966) debuted as a film critic for “Il Tevere” and “L’Italia letteraria” and worked as assistant director for Mario Camerini. He debuted as a director in 1933 with Treno popolare, but its lack of success convinced him to turn to comedy, with movies such as L’anonima Roylott (1936), L’albergo degli assenti (1939) and Giorno di nozze (1942). After shooting a number of films in Spain, he began a multi-year collaboration with the production company Titanus and made a long series of movies starring Amedeo Nazzari and Yvonne Sanson, and written by Aldo De Benedetti (Chains, 1949; Torment, 1950; Nobody’s Children, 1951; Chi è senza peccato…, 1952; Torna!, 1953; The White Angel, 1955). He returned to comedy during the 1960s and ended his career with the melodrama My Love (1964).

Filmography:
Treno popolare (1933), Kiki (1934), Joe il rosso (1936), L’anonima Roylott (1936), Sono stato io! (1937), L’albergo degli assenti (1939), Giù il sipario (1940), Trappola d’amore (1940), Notte di fortuna (1941), Giorno di nozze (1942), Il birichino di papà (1943), La fumeria d’oppio (1947), Lo sciopero dei milioni (1948), Paolo e Francesca (1949), Catene (1949), Tormento (1950), I figli di nessuno (1951), Il tenente Giorgio (1952), Chi è senza peccato... (1953), Torna! (1953), Vortice (1953), La schiava del peccato (1954), L’angelo bianco (1955), La risaia (1956), L’ultima violenza (1957), Malinconico autunno (1958), Cerasella (1960), Adultero lui, adultera lei (1963), I terribili 7 (1964), Amore mio (1964).

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia/director
Raffaello Matarazzo


contatti/contacts
Cineteca Nazionale
Laura Argento
laura.argento@fondazionecsc.it
www.fondazionecsc.it