IL SENTIRE DELL'OCCHIO

by Alessia Cecchet
THE HEARING OF THE EYE - IL SENTIRE DELL'OCCHIO

Informations

Nation: Italy, USA

Year: 2017

Length: 6'

35° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

The concept of death through a post-humanist lens: how humans understand and perceive “the other,” the animal, which is transformed the moment it dies. We look away, we change direction and our wonder turns into aversion.

Director

Alessia Cecchet

Alessia Cecchet

Alessia Cecchet (Feltre, Belluno, Italy) graduated from the University of Bologna with a degree in film studies. She completed her practical training in filmmaking at Syracuse University, New York, USA. She is currently pursuing a PhD at the University of California Santa Cruz and her thesis Salvate il soldato Donald. Cinema di animazione di propaganda americana durante il secondo conflitto mondiale has recently been published by Arcoiris after winning the Franco La Polla Prize at the 2013 Future Film Festival. In 2016 she took part at the Torino Film Festival with the short Onikuma.

Filmography:
Psycho-Drama (cm, 2014), Cold Fish (cm, 2015), Onikuma (cm, 2016), Il sentire dell’occhio (cm, 2017)

Cast and Credits

regia, fotografia, montaggio/director, cinematography, film editing
Alessia Cecchet

animazione/animation
Joshua Dean Tuthill
musica/music
Marco Giusto

**
contatti/contacts
Alessia Cecchet
filmandfibers@gmail.com
www.alessiacecchet.com

Director statement

“The inspiration for this film came to me last year on the beach. […] One day, while reading, I discovered that I was sitting nearby a dead and headless corpse of a sea lion. Even after this find, I decided to stay and I started to pay attention to the people passing by, trying to figure out whether they were noticing the animal or not. Most of them did not […] but at some point a young woman noticed the sea lion and from my position I could see her reaction. She showed it to her partner and the expression on her face went through a range of emotions. First, a gigantic smile, the belief that she had found a mammal on the beach and, then, the horror in the realization that the animal was dead. In a very brief amount of time the transition between wonder and abject happened.”

Synopsis Learn more

The concept of death through a post-humanist lens: how humans understand and perceive “the other,” the animal, which is transformed the moment it dies. We look away, we change direction and our wonder turns into aversion.

Director All about direction

Alessia Cecchet

Alessia Cecchet

Alessia Cecchet (Feltre, Belluno, Italy) graduated from the University of Bologna with a degree in film studies. She completed her practical training in filmmaking at Syracuse University, New York, USA. She is currently pursuing a PhD at the University of California Santa Cruz and her thesis Salvate il soldato Donald. Cinema di animazione di propaganda americana durante il secondo conflitto mondiale has recently been published by Arcoiris after winning the Franco La Polla Prize at the 2013 Future Film Festival. In 2016 she took part at the Torino Film Festival with the short Onikuma.

Filmography:
Psycho-Drama (cm, 2014), Cold Fish (cm, 2015), Onikuma (cm, 2016), Il sentire dell’occhio (cm, 2017)

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia, fotografia, montaggio/director, cinematography, film editing
Alessia Cecchet

animazione/animation
Joshua Dean Tuthill
musica/music
Marco Giusto

**
contatti/contacts
Alessia Cecchet
filmandfibers@gmail.com
www.alessiacecchet.com

Director statement Read more

“The inspiration for this film came to me last year on the beach. […] One day, while reading, I discovered that I was sitting nearby a dead and headless corpse of a sea lion. Even after this find, I decided to stay and I started to pay attention to the people passing by, trying to figure out whether they were noticing the animal or not. Most of them did not […] but at some point a young woman noticed the sea lion and from my position I could see her reaction. She showed it to her partner and the expression on her face went through a range of emotions. First, a gigantic smile, the belief that she had found a mammal on the beach and, then, the horror in the realization that the animal was dead. In a very brief amount of time the transition between wonder and abject happened.”