LA DISPARITION DES LUCIOLES

by Sébastien Pilote
THE FIREFLIES ARE GONE

Informations

Nation: Canada

Year: 2018

Length: 96'

36° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

Léo, a young and disaffected girl of a former industrial town in Quebec, meets Steve, a reclusive and aimless guitarist. Léo lives with her mother and stepfather Paul, a populist radio show host who forced her father into exile up north. Sylvain, Léo’s father, is a dethroned union leader whom she greatly misses. A stranger in her own world, it is through her relationship with Steve, set to the rhythm of guitar lessons and her new summer job, that she’ll be able to find comfort and ultimately take flight.

Director

Sébastien Pilote

Sébastien Pilote


Sébastien Pilote (Canada, 1973) got his degree in art and film from the University of Quebec at Chicoutimi and then worked as a programmer at the Festival Regard sur le court métrage in Saguenay. He next directed almost one hundred TV investigations on social topics and received four nominations for the Prix Gémeaux. In 2007 he directed his first short, Dust Bowl Ha! Ha!, which competed at many international festivals and won awards such as Quebec’s Film Critics Association Award, Best Short at the Festival du nouveau cinéma in Montreal and the Grand Prix at the Short Film Festival of Barcelona. His first feature film, Le vendeur (2011), was presented at over sixty festivals, including Sundance, Salonicco and the Torino Film Festival, where it won the FIPRESCI Award. His second feature, Le démantèlement (2014), was selected for the International Critics’ Week at Cannes, and won FIPRESCI Award in Turin. La disparition des lucioles is his third feature.

Filmography:
Dust Bowl Ha! Ha! (cm, 2007), Le vendeur (2011), Le démantèlement (2013), La disparition des lucioles (2018)

Cast and Credits

regia, sceneggiatura/director, screenplay
Sébastien Pilote
fotografia/cinematography
Michel La Veaux
montaggio/film editing
Stéphane Lafleur
scenografia/production design
Éric Barbeau
costumi/costume design
Sophie Lefebvre
musica/music
Philippe Brault
suono/sound
Gilles Corbeil, Olivier Calvert, Stéphane Bergeron
interpreti e personaggi/cast and characters
Karelle Tremblay (Léo), Pierre-Luc Brillant (Steve), François Papineau (Paul), Luc Picard  (Sylvain), Marie-France Marcotte (la madre di Léo/Léo’s mother)
produttori/producers
Bernadette Payeur, Marc Daigle
produzione/production
Corporation Acpav

**
contatti/contacts
Seville International
Ruby Rondina
[email protected]
www.filmsseville.com

Director statement

“I wanted to make this film more accessible than the previous ones. I wanted its form to resemble, or at least to have the appearance of, a popular movie. I longed for a simple and direct style that wouldn’t be too lyrical. Each shot had to be as straight as possible. If it were a novel or a story, it would be written in short, simple sentences; the style would be unadorned, but would not turn its back on metaphor or allegory. It could have been a graphic novel or a song… From the start I kept saying that the film was designed to sound like a pop song. It had to be like a little song, a kind of brief melody that vanishes at the moment it appears, haunting and fugitive.”

Synopsis Learn more

Léo, a young and disaffected girl of a former industrial town in Quebec, meets Steve, a reclusive and aimless guitarist. Léo lives with her mother and stepfather Paul, a populist radio show host who forced her father into exile up north. Sylvain, Léo’s father, is a dethroned union leader whom she greatly misses. A stranger in her own world, it is through her relationship with Steve, set to the rhythm of guitar lessons and her new summer job, that she’ll be able to find comfort and ultimately take flight.

Director All about direction

Sébastien Pilote

Sébastien Pilote


Sébastien Pilote (Canada, 1973) got his degree in art and film from the University of Quebec at Chicoutimi and then worked as a programmer at the Festival Regard sur le court métrage in Saguenay. He next directed almost one hundred TV investigations on social topics and received four nominations for the Prix Gémeaux. In 2007 he directed his first short, Dust Bowl Ha! Ha!, which competed at many international festivals and won awards such as Quebec’s Film Critics Association Award, Best Short at the Festival du nouveau cinéma in Montreal and the Grand Prix at the Short Film Festival of Barcelona. His first feature film, Le vendeur (2011), was presented at over sixty festivals, including Sundance, Salonicco and the Torino Film Festival, where it won the FIPRESCI Award. His second feature, Le démantèlement (2014), was selected for the International Critics’ Week at Cannes, and won FIPRESCI Award in Turin. La disparition des lucioles is his third feature.

Filmography:
Dust Bowl Ha! Ha! (cm, 2007), Le vendeur (2011), Le démantèlement (2013), La disparition des lucioles (2018)

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia, sceneggiatura/director, screenplay
Sébastien Pilote
fotografia/cinematography
Michel La Veaux
montaggio/film editing
Stéphane Lafleur
scenografia/production design
Éric Barbeau
costumi/costume design
Sophie Lefebvre
musica/music
Philippe Brault
suono/sound
Gilles Corbeil, Olivier Calvert, Stéphane Bergeron
interpreti e personaggi/cast and characters
Karelle Tremblay (Léo), Pierre-Luc Brillant (Steve), François Papineau (Paul), Luc Picard  (Sylvain), Marie-France Marcotte (la madre di Léo/Léo’s mother)
produttori/producers
Bernadette Payeur, Marc Daigle
produzione/production
Corporation Acpav

**
contatti/contacts
Seville International
Ruby Rondina
[email protected]
www.filmsseville.com

Director statement Read more

“I wanted to make this film more accessible than the previous ones. I wanted its form to resemble, or at least to have the appearance of, a popular movie. I longed for a simple and direct style that wouldn’t be too lyrical. Each shot had to be as straight as possible. If it were a novel or a story, it would be written in short, simple sentences; the style would be unadorned, but would not turn its back on metaphor or allegory. It could have been a graphic novel or a song… From the start I kept saying that the film was designed to sound like a pop song. It had to be like a little song, a kind of brief melody that vanishes at the moment it appears, haunting and fugitive.”