MACHINE TO MACHINE

by Philippe Rouy
MACHINE TO MACHINE

Informations

Nation: France

Year: 2013

Length: 32'

36° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL

Section:

Synopsis

In Fukushima Dai-ichi, after the 2011 tsunami, the bowels of the devastated nuclear plant still keep human beings at a distance and will do so for a very long time. Only machines – drones, robots, cranes – can approach it. These devices are filming for the benefit of human beings what they can no longer see. The footage which Tepco has declared to be for scientific exploration only turns out to be a hallucinatory journey into the heart of an indomitable radioactive magma.

Director

Philippe Rouy

Philippe  Rouy

Philippe Rouy (France) is a videoartist who has made several films screened in many international film festivals; at the Vila do Conde Film Festival in 2009 he presented Hypn, which also received the Best Film Award at the Stuttgarter Filmwinter. In 2011 La voûte was selected at Rotterdam, and Cheval blême at the Oberhausen Festival. From 2012 to 2014 he realized three shorts on the devastation of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant during the tsunami in March 11th, 2011: 4 bâtiments, face à la mer (2012), wich gained a special mention at FIDMarseille and participated in documentary competition in Turin, Machine to Machine (2013) and Fovea Centralis (2014). They form the so-calleed “Fukushima Trilogy.”

Filmography:
Beyrouth, littoral (cm, 2002), Etán (cm, 2004), Au fur que tu perdras la vue (2008), Survisions (2008), Hypn (cm, 2009), Cheval blême (2009), La voûte (2010), 1862 (2011), 4 bâtiments, face à la mer (mm, 2012), Machine to Machine (mm, 2013), Fovea Centralis (mm, 2014).

Cast and Credits

regia, montaggio, suono/director, film editing, sound
Philippe Rouy

contatti/contacts
Philippe Rouy
[email protected]

Director statement

“These images bring the TEPCO engineers and the viewers such as me onto the same level. We are all dependent on the representations of a camera held by a machine to understand what is happening inside the nuclear plant. But what I see here is a delirious relationship between two machines: the machine that is filming and the machine that is filmed. The absence of the human is key here. The nuclear disaster reveals the material gaining the upper hand over man.”

Synopsis Learn more

In Fukushima Dai-ichi, after the 2011 tsunami, the bowels of the devastated nuclear plant still keep human beings at a distance and will do so for a very long time. Only machines – drones, robots, cranes – can approach it. These devices are filming for the benefit of human beings what they can no longer see. The footage which Tepco has declared to be for scientific exploration only turns out to be a hallucinatory journey into the heart of an indomitable radioactive magma.

Director All about direction

Philippe Rouy

Philippe  Rouy

Philippe Rouy (France) is a videoartist who has made several films screened in many international film festivals; at the Vila do Conde Film Festival in 2009 he presented Hypn, which also received the Best Film Award at the Stuttgarter Filmwinter. In 2011 La voûte was selected at Rotterdam, and Cheval blême at the Oberhausen Festival. From 2012 to 2014 he realized three shorts on the devastation of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant during the tsunami in March 11th, 2011: 4 bâtiments, face à la mer (2012), wich gained a special mention at FIDMarseille and participated in documentary competition in Turin, Machine to Machine (2013) and Fovea Centralis (2014). They form the so-calleed “Fukushima Trilogy.”

Filmography:
Beyrouth, littoral (cm, 2002), Etán (cm, 2004), Au fur que tu perdras la vue (2008), Survisions (2008), Hypn (cm, 2009), Cheval blême (2009), La voûte (2010), 1862 (2011), 4 bâtiments, face à la mer (mm, 2012), Machine to Machine (mm, 2013), Fovea Centralis (mm, 2014).

Cast and Credits Discover the cast of the film

regia, montaggio, suono/director, film editing, sound
Philippe Rouy

contatti/contacts
Philippe Rouy
[email protected]

Director statement Read more

“These images bring the TEPCO engineers and the viewers such as me onto the same level. We are all dependent on the representations of a camera held by a machine to understand what is happening inside the nuclear plant. But what I see here is a delirious relationship between two machines: the machine that is filming and the machine that is filmed. The absence of the human is key here. The nuclear disaster reveals the material gaining the upper hand over man.”