Torino Film Festival
Italiano

DAIT?A SENS?

THE GREATER EAST ASIAN WAR - t.i. LA GUERRA PER LA GRANDE ASIA ORIENTALE

Brazil 1968 (16mm, 97', )

go to  27° TORINO FILM FESTIVAL  go to  NAGISA OSHIMA

THE GREATER EAST ASIA WAR
Vintage film clips, with their original
soundtrack, illustrate the key moments
of the Daitoa senso, which means
“The Greater East Asian War”
(the official name which was make
public by the Japanese government
in December 1941). As the situation
precipitates, the number of Japanese
film clips diminish and American films
clips must be used.

regia/director
Nagisa Oshima
montaggio/film editing
Takashi Ueno
suono/sound
Takao Morimoto
produttore/producer
Junichi Ushiyama
produzione/production
NTV

Nagisa Oshima

Born to the descendent of a samurai family, Nagisa
Oshima lost his father when he was six years old.
As an adolescent, he dedicated himself to reading
books about Marxism and socialism that he found
in his father’s library. After receiving his law degree
from Kyoto University, where he participated in
student protests against the American military
presence in Japan, he was hired by the production
company Shochiku, which produced films by
directors such as Yasujiro Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi
and Akira Kurosawa. He worked as an assistant to
Masaki Kobayashi and Hideo Oba before he
debuted as a director during a financial crisis that
had convinced Shochiku to launch new directors,
including Oshima, Shohei Imamura, Yoshishige
Yoshida and Masahiro Shinoda, thus inaugurating
Japan’s nouvelle vague. In 1960, Oshima directed
Cruel Story of Youth and The Sun’s Burial but t
he film which brought Oshima’s name to the
attention of the public and the critics was Night
and Fog in Japan,
which was withdrawn from
circulation after only three days because of its
radical content. As a result, Oshima abandoned
Shochiku and founded the independent production
company Sozosha. During the Sixties, he alternated
making television documentaries and feature films
such as Violence at High Noon (1966), about the
true story of a serial killer who had terrorized Japan
during the Fifties, Death by Hanging (1968),
Diary of a Shinjuku Thief, which is loosely based
on the writings of Jean Genet, and Boy (1969).
In 1970, his film The Man Who Left His Will on
Film
was released, followed the next year by The
Ceremony.
In 1976, he shot In the Realm of the
Senses
, based on a crime that took place in Japan
in the Thirties and which followed in the tradition
of the Japanese erotic genre pinku eiga. Because
of its explicit sexuality, the film was blocked by the
censors and was never projected in an uncut version
in Japan. In 1978, Oshima won the prize for Best
Director at the Cannes Film Festival with Empire
of Passion,
which was followed in 1983 by Merry
Christmas, Mr Lawrence
; the film starred David
Bowie, Ryuichi Sakamoto and Takeshi Kitano
and screened in competition at Cannes. Three years
later, he and Jean-Claude Carrière co-wrote the
film Max mon amour, starring Charlotte
Rampling. In 1994, he made the documentary 100
Years of Japanese Cinema
and in 1999 he directed
Gohatto, once again starring Takeshi Kitano.
He was president of the Directors Guild of Japan
from 1980 to 1996.

FILMOGRAPHY
(Updated to the last partecipation to TFF)
Ashita no taiyo (Tomorrow’s Sun, cm, 1959), Ai to
kibo no machi (A Town of Love and Hope,
1959),
Seishun zankoku monogatari (Cruel Story of Youth,
1960), Taiyo no hakaba (The Sun’s Burial, 1960),
Nihon no yoru to kiri (Night and Fog in Japan,
1960), Shiiku (The Catch, 1961), Eiga shi - Kori no
naka no Seishun (Youth on the Ice,
cm, doc., TV,
1962), Amakusa Shiro Tokisada (Shiro Amakusa,
the Christian Rebel,
1962), Chiisana boken ryoko
(A Small Child’s First Adventure,
1963),
Wasurerareta Kogun (Forgotten Soldiers,
cm, doc.,
TV, 1963), Aru kokutetsu jomuin suto chushi zenya
(A National Railway Worker,
cm, doc., TV, 1964),
Hankotsu no toride (A Rebel’s Fortress,
cm, doc.,
TV, 1964), Seishun no hi (The Tomb of Youth,
mm, doc., TV, 1964), Etsuraku (Pleasures of the
Flesh,
1965), Yunbogi no nikki (Diary of Yunbogi,
cm, 1965), Hakuchu no torima (Violence at Noon,
1966), Kokujin kokka tanjo (Nation of Nigro, cm,
doc., TV, 1966), Ninja buge-cho (Band of Ninja,
1967), Nihon shunka-ko (Sing a Song of Sex,
1967), Muri shinju: Nihon no natsu (Japanese
Summer: Double Suicide,
1967), Koshikei (Death
by Hanging,
1968), Kaettekita yopparai (Three
Resurrected Drunkards,
1968), Daitoa senso
(The Greater East Asia War,
doc., TV, 1968),
Shinjuku dorobo nikki (Diary of a Shinjuku Thief,
1968), Shonen (Boy, 1969), Tokyo senso sengo
hiwa (The Man who Left His Will on Film,
1970),
Gishiki (The Ceremony,
1971), Kyojin-gun (Giants,
doc., TV, 1972), Joi! Bangura (Joi Bangla!, cm,
doc., 1972), Natsu no imoto (Dear Summer Sister,
1972), Goze momoku no onna-tabigeinin (The
Journey of the Blind Musicians,
cm, doc., TV,
1972), Bengaru no chichi-raman (The Father
of Bangladesh,
cm, doc., TV, 1973), Ikite iru -
Nihonkai kaisen (The Battle of Tsushima,
mm,
doc., TV, 1975), Ai no korida (Ecco l’impero dei
sensi,
1976), Denki motakuto (The Life of Mao,
doc., TV, 1976), Ikite iru - umi no bohyo torakku
no kaitei wo yuku (Graves at Sea,
cm, doc., TV,
1976), Ikite iru - Gyokusai no shima saipan no
kaitei wo yuku (The Island of the Final Battle,
cm, doc., TV, 1976), Ai no borei (L’impero della
passione,
1978), Merry Christmas, Mr Lawrence
(Furyo,
1983), Max mon amour (Max amore
mio,
1986), Kyoto, My Mother’s Place (mm, 1991),
Nihon eiga no hyaku nen (100 Years of Japanese
Cinema,
doc., TV, 1994), Gohatto (Tabù-Gohatto,
1999).

Tfl Bkgd